Office of Governmental Relations

2019 Legislative Updates

2019 Legislative Updates

2019 End of Session Summary

May 3, 2019

The 2019 Iowa Legislature adjourned on Saturday, April 27. From this date, Governor Reynolds has 30 days to sign or veto legislation. Here are highlights of budget legislation adopted this year that have an impact on UNI.

HF 758 Education Budget bill for FY 20

  • Appropriated a lump sum of $12 million to the Board of Regents for allocation to the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and UNI. The funds are to specifically support new strategic initiatives, meet needs caused by enrollment increases, meet the demand for new courses and services, to fund new but unavoidable or mandated cost increases, and to support any other initiatives important to the core functions of the universities. UNI’s budget request was $4 million.
  • The Governor's STEM Advisory Council, which is housed at UNI, is funded at $6,446,375, an increase of $1 million from FY 19. 
  • UNI’s two other budget line-items are funded at the same level as FY 19: 
    • Recycling and Reuse Center funded at $175,256 
    • Real Estate Education Program funded at $125,302

SF 608 Economic Development Budget bill for FY 20

  • Status quo funding for UNI’s Business and Community Services (BCS) from the Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This includes $1,066,419 for UNI’s economic development programs, where at least $617,638 of this amount is to be allocated to support entrepreneurs through the Center for Business Growth and Innovation and Advance Iowa. Expenditures for research must go toward projects that will provide economic stimulus for Iowa and emphasis must be provided to services to Iowa-based companies.
  • Fully funds UNI’s $400,000 request for the expansion of the UNI Metal Casting Center's additive manufacturing capabilities related to investment castings technology and industry support.
  • The Regents Innovation Fund is also provided status quo funding of $3 million to the three public universities where $900,000 is allocated to UNI.

HF 765 Infrastructure Budget bill

  • Provides a $1 million appropriation in FY 2021 for the Industrial Technology Center (ITC) planning money to start the renovation and expansion of the building. There is no out-year funding to complete the project. Both budget chairs have said UNI’s ITC building project is at the top of their list for next legislative session.
  • Requires a 20% UNI match from public and private funds for infrastructure projects starting July 1, 2020 (this language is struck in SF 638, the standings budget bill).

SF 638 Standings and Miscellaneous Budget Bill

  • Strikes language in the infrastructure budget bill that would have require UNI to provide a 20% match for construction projects (and 40% match requirement for UI and ISU) to receive state infrastructure dollars. Replaces it with language that the Board of Regents provide:
    • A report to the General Assembly on construction costs for previous year projects for all three universities; and
    • A proposal going forward pertaining to a match requirement.

Other policy bills of interest:

SF 188 – Allows nonprojectile stun guns on Regents universities and community colleges campuses. The universities are allowed to ban them from inside the buildings or physical structures of any stadium or hospital. Persons convicted of a felony can also be prohibited.

SF 274 – Free speech on campuses. The bill directs the Board of Regents to adopt a policy addressing speech and expression at the universities under its jurisdiction. At their April Board meeting, the Board adopted the new policy: The Board of Regents is committed to the principles of free expression embodied in the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and Article 1, Section 7 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa. The Board recognizes that the primary mission of the institutions of higher education under its jurisdiction is the promotion of teaching, research, and scholarship. In support of this mission, the institutions of higher education under the jurisdiction of the Board of Regents must provide ample opportunity for members of the campus community to engage in the free exchange of ideas.

SF 617 – Sports wagering/fantasy sports betting. Sports betting does not include bets on the performance or non-performance of any individual athlete participating in a single game or match where a collegiate team from the state of Iowa is a participant. This would not allow any bets to be placed on an in-state college player, or on the opposing team’s players for that specific game; no matter if the game is played in Iowa or in another state.

SF 507 – Relates to workers compensation from injuries from falls. It specifically says personal injuries due to idiopathic or unexplained falls from a level surface on to the same level surface do not arise out of and in the course of employment and are not compensable under their chapter.

HF 392 – Exempt certain types of professional services from competitive bidding. The Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board brought the bill forward. Iowa Code section 68B.3 currently prohibits government officials and employees from selling goods or services in excess of $2,000 to ANY state agency absent public notice and competitive bidding. The conundrum with 68B.3 is that state law currently exempts certain types of services from competitive bidding, regardless of the amount of the contract (e.g. expert witnesses, doctors, lawyers, architects, engineers) but 68B.3 does not exclude those types of contracts. The bill amends 68B.3 to state the statute does not apply to a contract for professional services that is exempt from competitive bidding. The Ethics Board does not see the harm in excluding from 68B.3 professional services that are already exempt from competitive bidding requirements. The conflicts-of-interests statutes in chapter 68B would still apply.

SF 159 – Requires the Iowa Department of Education (DE) to develop rules that set the passing score for the end of program assessment test with the teacher preparation program (the PRAXIS test at UNI). The bill also establishes a one-year nonrenewable initial teacher license for a teacher candidate who hasn't passed the end of program assessment. The state board shall adopt rules to provide that the director of DE shall waive the assessment requirements for not more than one year for a person who has completed the course requirements for an approved practitioner preparation program but attained an assessment score below the minimum passing scores set by the department for successful completion of the program.

SF 319 – Effective July 1, 2019, a peace officer or retired peace officer is allowed to conduct the driving portion of driver’s education; if they wanted to do the coursework, they still would have to be certified through a driver’s education program.

SF 228 – Bioscience-based economic development. A Bioscience Development Corporation is to be established for expanding bioscience-based economic development opportunities in the state of Iowa. The corporation is also to further the overall development and economic well-being of the state. It replaces the current Iowa Innovation Corporation. The bill then changes the make-up of the Iowa Innovation Council (there will still be 29 voting members; changes who will be on the council). The duties of the Iowa Innovation Council do not change; they will continue to do what they've done in the past as it relates to all targeted industries.

SF 341 – Relates to assistance animals and service animals in housing, service animals and service-animals-in-training in public accommodations, and misrepresentation of an animal as a service animal or a service-animal-in-training, and providing penalties.

SF 603 - Authorizes use of concurrent enrollment programs for teaching certain math and science subjects.

 

 

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 14

April 19, 2019

Budget bills and their status:

HF 759 - ADMINISTRATION & REGULATION (Passed House 54-46; on Senate floor)

SF 609 - AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES (Passed Senate 32-18; Amended and Passed House 54-45; on Senate floor with House amendment)

SF 608 - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (Passed Senate 32-18; on House floor)

HF 758 - EDUCATION (Passed House 54-46; on Senate floor)

HF 766 - HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (Passed House 54-44; in Senate budget subcommittee)

SF 616 - JUDICIAL BRANCH (Passed Senate 35-15; on House floor)

SF 615 - JUSTICE SYSTEMS (Passed Senate 32-18; on House floor)

HF 765- INFRASTRUCTURE (Passed House 100-0; on Senate floor)

SF 600 - TRANSPORTATION (Passed Senate 46-0; Passed House 100-0; to Governor)

SSB 1262 – STANDINGS AND MISCELLANEOUS (in Senate Appropriations Committee)

The Senate provided their version of the infrastructure budget bill this week. The Senate adds a $1 million appropriation in FY 2021 for the Industrial Technology Center (ITC) planning money to start our renovation and expansion. They did not provide any out-year funding to complete the project. Both budget chairs have said UNI’s ITC building project is at the top of their list for next legislative session.

The Senate provided their version of the education budget bill this week. The Senate funds UNI as follows:

  • $12 million to the Board of Regents to distribute to the three universities for general aid operating budgets (House is at $15.9 million). This is $6 million below the Board and the Governor’s recommendation of $18 million ($4 million for UNI and $7 million each to ISU and UI). The money is to support new strategic initiatives, meet needs caused by enrollment increases, meet the demand for new courses and services, to fund new but unavoidable or mandated cost increases, and to support any other initiatives important to the core functions of the universities.
  • $300,000 increase for the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, which is housed at UNI. The House has a $1 million increase.
  • Status quo funding of $175,256 for UNI’s recycling and reuse center, same as the House.
  • Status quo funding of $125,302 for UNI’s real estate education program, same as the House.

The House provided their version of the economic development budget bill this week. The House funds UNI as follows:

  • Maintains the $1,066,419 appropriation for the metal casting center, the MyEntreNet internet application, and the Institute for Decision Making. From this appropriation, $617,638 is allocated to support entrepreneurs though UNI’s Center for Business Growth and Innovation and Advance Iowa. This is the same as the Senate.
  • Fully funds UNI’s $400,000 request for the expansion of the UNI Metal Casting Center's additive manufacturing capabilities related to investment castings technology and industry support. The Senate funds this request at $300,000.
  • Maintains the $3 million appropriation for the Regents Innovation Fund; UNI’s Business and Community Services (BCS) receives $900,000 from this appropriation.

Differences between the House and Senate on all budget bills still need to be ironed out before the bills can go to the Governor’s desk and the Legislature can adjourn for the year. The final day they receive per diems is May 3.

The Senate passed the sports wagering/fantasy sports betting legislation this week, SF 617. The bill is on the House debate calendar for Monday. Language is included in the bill that says sports betting does not include bets on the performance or non-performance of any individual athlete participating in a single game or match where a collegiate team from the state of Iowa is a participant. This would not allow any bets to be placed on an in-state college player, or on the opposing team’s players for that specific game; no matter if the game is played in Iowa or in another state.

The bill specifically says: “Sports wagering” does not include placing a wager on the performance or nonperformance of any individual athlete participating in a single game or match of a collegiate sporting event in which a collegiate team from this state is a participant, or placing a wager on the performance of athletes in an individual international sporting event governed by the international Olympic committee in which any participant in the international sporting event is under eighteen years of age.

When this language was included in the House bill, HF 748, the Board of Regents released a statement stating they were pleased this language has been added to the bill. Maintaining the integrity of our student-athletes is of paramount importance to the Board. This language is a positive step in that direction. 

 

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 13

April 12, 2019

Budget bills and their status:

HF 759 - ADMINISTRATION & REGULATION (Passed House 54-46; in Senate budget subcommittee)

SF 609 - AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES (Passed Senate 32-18; on House floor)

SF 608 - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (Senate floor)

HF 758 - EDUCATION (Passed House 54-46; in Senate budget subcommittee)

HF 766 - HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (Passed House 54-44; in Senate budget subcommittee)

SF 616 - JUDICIAL BRANCH (Senate floor)

SF 615 - JUSTICE SYSTEMS (Senate floor)

HF 765- INFRASTRUCTURE (Passed House 100-0; in Senate budget subcommittee)

SF 600 - TRANSPORTATION (Passed Senate 46-0; Passed House 100-0; to Governor)

?? STANDINGS AND MISCELLANEOUS (starting in Senate)

The infrastructure budget bill unanimously passed the House on April 9. The bill now goes the Senate for their consideration.

  • UNI’s $38 million request to modernize the Industrial Technology Center (ITC) is not contained in the House bill. During floor debate discussion, the chair of the budget subcommittee, Rep. Gary Mohr, did say UNI’s building project is at the top of his list for next session for the three-year funding request. 
  • The bill does appropriate tuition replacement dollars to the Board of Regents and $4.3 million to the Iowa School for the Deaf to remodel their high school building Long Hall. Previously enacted funding to ISU for the student innovation center and vet diagnostic laboratory did not change and the projects will receive their appropriations.

SF 507 now goes to the governor for her signature. The bill relates to workers compensation from injuries from falls. It specifically says personal injuries due to idiopathic or unexplained falls from a level surface on to the same level surface do not arise out of and in the course of employment and are not compensable under their chapter.

HF 392 is also on its way to the governor for her signature. The Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board brought the bill forward. Iowa Code section 68B.3 currently prohibits government officials and employees from selling goods or services in excess of $2,000 to ANY state agency absent public notice and competitive bidding. The conundrum with 68B.3 is that state law currently exempts certain types of services from competitive bidding, regardless of the amount of the contract (e.g. expert witnesses, doctors, lawyers, architects, engineers) but 68B.3 does not exclude those types of contracts. The bill amends 68B.3 to state the statute does not apply to a contract for professional services that is exempt from competitive bidding. The Ethics Board does not see the harm in excluding from 68B.3 professional services that are already exempt from competitive bidding requirements. The conflicts-of-interests statutes in chapter 68B would still apply.

The House and Senate are still working on the sports wagering/fantasy sports betting legislation. Agreements have not yet been made. The bills are SF 617 and HF 748.HF

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 12

April 5, 2019

All the budget bills now have bill numbers (except the final standings and miscellaneous budget bill), as follows:

HF 759 - ADMINISTRATION & REGULATION (starting in House)

SF 609 - AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES (starting in Senate)

SF 608 - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (starting in Senate)

HF 758 - EDUCATION (starting in House)

HF 766 - HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (starting in House)

SSB 1254 - JUDICIAL BRANCH (starting in Senate)

SSB 1255 - JUSTICE SYSTEMS (starting in Senate)

HF 765- INFRASTRUCTURE (starting in House)

SF 600 - TRANSPORTATION (starting in Senate)

?? STANDINGS AND MISCELLANEOUS (starting in Senate)

The education budget bill (HF 758) passed the House on Thursday, April 4, by a party-line vote. The bill now goes the Senate. The bill appropriates the following as it relates to UNI:

  • $15.9 million to the Board of Regents to distribute to the three universities for general aid operating budgets. This is $2.1 million below the Board and the Governor’s recommendation of $18 million ($4 million for UNI and $7 million each to ISU and UI). The money is to support new strategic initiatives, meet needs caused by enrollment increases, meet the demand for new courses and services, to fund new but unavoidable or mandated cost increases, and to support any other initiatives important to the core functions of the universities.
  • $1 million increase for the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, which is housed at UNI.
  • Status quo funding of $175,256 for UNI’s recycling and reuse center.
  • Status quo funding of $125,302 for UNI’s real estate education program.

The House infrastructure budget subcommittee and the House Appropriation Committee passed the infrastructure budget bill this week. The bill does not contain the $38 million UNI has requested to modernize the Industrial Technology Center building. We will continue to advocate this summer and fall in the hopes that the Legislature funds our ITC infrastructure request during the 2020 legislative session.

SF 159 is on its way to the Governor for her signature. The bill requires the Iowa Department of Education (DE) to develop rules that set the passing score for the end of program assessment test with the teacher preparation program (the PRAXIS test here at UNI). The bill also establishes a one-year nonrenewable initial teacher license for a teacher candidate who hasn't passed the end of program assessment. The state board shall adopt rules to provide that the director of DE shall waive the assessment requirements for not more than one year for a person who has completed the course requirements for an approved practitioner preparation program but attained an assessment score below the minimum passing scores set by the department for successful completion of the program.

Today is the Legislature’s second funnel date, when Senate bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of House committees and House bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of Senate committees. This deadline does not apply to appropriations, taxes and government oversight legislation.

Some of the policy bills we are monitoring that remain eligible this legislative session:

HF 392 – exempts contracts for professional services from competitive bidding requirements; the conflicts-of-interests statutes in the Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board chapter would still apply

HF 477/SF 228 – Bioscience-based economic development

HF 684/SF 342 – Medical Amnesty (immunity in alcohol cases)

HF 748/SF 366 – Sports wagering/fantasy sports betting bill

SF 188 – Allows nonprojectile stun guns on campuses

SF 274 – Free speech on campus (signed into law; effective March 27, 2019)

SF 316 – Special Education Study

SF 319 – Peace officers allowed to provide the driving portion of driver’s education

SF 341 – Service animals and service animals in training

SF 394 – Online courses at K-12 schools

SF 447 – Residential rental caps for housing

The bills allowing persons with carry permits to keep their weapons out of sight in their locked vehicle at workplace have died.

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 11

March 29, 2019

This week, a few budget bills have been introduced and debated.

HSB 248 – House Education Budget bill

SF 608 – Senate Economic Development Budget bill

SSB 1251 – Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Budget Bill (water quality/soil conservation)

The House education budget subcommittee passed HSB 248 out of subcommittee on a party-line vote of 5-4 on March 27; the bill awaits debate in the House Appropriations Committee. The bill appropriates:

  • $15.9 million to the Board of Regents to distribute to the three universities for general aid operating budgets. This is $2.1 million below the Board and the Governor’s recommendation of $18 million ($4 million for UNI and $7 million each to ISU and UI). The money is to support new strategic initiatives, meet needs caused by enrollment increases, meet the demand for new courses and services, to fund new but unavoidable or mandated cost increases, and to support any other initiatives important to the core functions of the universities.
  • $1 million increase for the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, which is housed at UNI.
  • Status quo funding of $175,256 for UNI’s recycling and reuse center.
  • Status quo funding of $125,302 for UNI’s real estate education program.

On March 28, the Senate Appropriations Committee adopted the economic development budget bill on a party-line vote of 12-8; the bill awaits full Senate floor debate. The bill provides the following to UNI:

  • Maintains the $1,066,419 appropriation for the metal casting center, the MyEntreNet internet application, and the Institute for Decision Making. From this appropriation, $617,638 is allocated to support entrepreneurs though UNI’s Center for Business Growth and Innovation and Advance Iowa.
  • A new $250,000 appropriation, plus three full-time employee positions, to support staffing, equipment and technology for the expansion of the UNI Metal Casting Center's additive manufacturing capabilities related to investment castings technology and industry support. This is partial funding of our requested $400,000.
  • Maintains the $3 million appropriation for the Regents Innovation Fund; UNI’s Business and Community Services (BCS) receives $900,000 from this appropriation.

The free speech on campus bill, SF 274, was signed into law this week. The bill went into effect upon enactment of March 27, 2019.  The Board of Regents is currently working on the required policy, as outlined in the bill.

Committee action continues to occur as lawmakers are trying to get their policy bills voted out of committee prior to the second funnel, which is April 5.  This is when Senate bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of House committees and House bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of Senate committees. This deadline does not apply to appropriations, taxes and government oversight legislation.

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 10

March 22, 2019

This week, there was a lot of floor debate by both the Senate and the House. In addition, committee action continues to occur as lawmakers are trying to get their policy bills voted out of committee prior to the second funnel, which is April 5.  This is when Senate bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of House committees and House bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of Senate committees. This deadline does not apply to appropriations, taxes and government oversight legislation.

The House Ways and Means Committee amended and passed the sports wagering/fantasy sports betting bill (HF 648) this week, on a 16-9 vote. This bill will get a new bill number when it becomes a Ways and Means Committee bill (meaning it will not die during the second funnel).

An amendment was adopted by the House Ways and Means Committee that says sports betting does not include bets on the performance or non-performance of any individual athlete participating in a single game or match where a collegiate team from the state of Iowa is a participant. This would not allow any bets to be placed on an in-state college player, or on the opposing team’s players for that specific game; no matter if the game is played in Iowa or in another state.

The Board of Regents released a statement stating they were pleased this amendment has been added to the bill. Maintaining the integrity of our student-athletes is of paramount importance to the Board. This amendment is a positive step in that direction.

We will continue to monitor the language of the bill as it moves through the legislative process.  We want to ensure that the integrity of our student-athletes is maintained.

Upcoming Deadlines

April 5 is the Legislature’s second funnel date.

May 3 is the 110th calendar day of the session and the legislator’s daily per diem expenses end.

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 9

March 15, 2019

This week, both the Senate and the House adopted the bill on free speech and free expression on public higher education campuses, which would apply to the three Regents universities and Iowa’s community colleges. Once the bill is enrolled, it will be sent to Governor Reynolds. She will then have three days for her signature. When signed, the law would go into effect immediately.

Senate File 274 creates a new code section in the Iowa Code, 261H. The bill requires the Iowa Board of Regents and the Board of Directors of each community college to adopt a policy that includes all of the following statements:

  1. That the primary function of an institution of higher education is the discovery, improvement, transmission, and dissemination of knowledge by means of research, teaching, discussion, and debate. This statement shall provide that, to fulfill this function, the institution must strive to ensure the fullest degree of intellectual freedom and free expression allowed under the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States.
  2. 2. (a) That it is not the proper role of an institution of higher education to shield individuals from speech protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which may include ideas and opinions the individual finds unwelcome, disagreeable, or even offensive; and (b) That it is the proper role of an institution of higher education to encourage diversity of thoughts, ideas, and opinions and to encourage, within the bounds of the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the peaceful, respectful, and safe exercise of first amendment rights.
  3. That students and faculty have the freedom to discuss any problem that presents itself, assemble, and engage in spontaneous expressive activity on campus, within the bounds of established principles of the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States, and subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions that are consistent with established first amendment principles.
  4. That the outdoor areas of campus of an institution of higher education are public forums, open on the same terms to any invited speaker subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions that are consistent with established principles of the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

The bill then moves on to protected activities:

  1. Noncommercial expressive activities protected under the provisions of this chapter include but are not limited to any lawful oral or written means by which members of the campus community may communicate ideas to one another, including but not limited to all forms of peaceful assembly, protests, speeches including by invited speakers, distribution of literature, circulating petitions, and publishing, including publishing or streaming on an internet site, audio or video recorded in outdoor areas of campus.
  2. A member of the campus community who wishes to engage in noncommercial expressive activity in outdoor areas of campus must be permitted to do so freely, subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions, and as long as the member’s conduct is not unlawful, does not impede others’ access to a facility or use of walkways, and does not disrupt the functioning of the public institution of higher education, subject to the protections of subsection 1. The public institution of higher education may designate other areas of campus available for use by the campus community according to institutional policy, but in all cases access to designated areas of campus shall be granted on a viewpoint-neutral basis within the bounds of established first amendment principles.
  3. A public institution of higher education shall not deny benefits or privileges available to student organizations based on the viewpoint of a student organization or the expression of the viewpoint of a student organization by the student organization or its members protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States. In addition, a public institution of higher education shall not deny any benefit or privilege to a student organization based on the student organization’s requirement that the leaders of the student organization agree to and support the student organization’s beliefs, as those beliefs are interpreted and applied by the organization, and to further the student organization’s mission.
  4. This section shall not be interpreted as limiting the right of student expression in a counter demonstration held in an outdoor area of campus as long as the conduct at the counter demonstration is not unlawful, does not materially and substantially prohibit the free expression rights of others in an outdoor area of campus or disrupt the functioning of the public institution of higher education, and does not impede others’ access to a facility or use of walkways, subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions that are consistent with established principles of the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States.
  5. This chapter shall not be interpreted as preventing public institutions of higher education from prohibiting, limiting, or restricting expression that the first amendment of the Constitution of the United States does not protect, including but not limited to a threat of serious harm and expression directed or likely directed to provoke imminent unlawful actions; or from prohibiting harassment, including but not limited to expression which is so severe, pervasive, and subjectively and objectively offensive that the expression unreasonably interferes with an individual’s access to educational opportunities or benefits provided by a public institution of higher education.

Public forums on campus and freedom of association are then explained:

  1. The outdoor areas of campuses of public institutions of higher education in this state shall be deemed public forums. Public institutions of higher education may maintain and enforce clear, published, reasonable viewpoint-neutral time, place, and manner restrictions that are narrowly tailored in furtherance of a significant institutional interest, but shall allow members of the campus community to engage in spontaneous expressive activity and to distribute literature. Restrictions instituted by a public institution of higher education under this section shall provide for ample alternative means of expression.
  2. Except as provided in this chapter, and subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions, a public institution of higher education shall not designate any area of campus a free-speech zone or otherwise create policies restricting expressive activities to a particular outdoor area of campus.
  3. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to grant individuals the right to engage in conduct that intentionally, materially, and substantially disrupts the expressive activity of a person or student organization if the public institution of higher education has reserved space in an outdoor area of campus for activity by the person or student organization in accordance with this chapter.

Finally, the bill spells out the remedies, statute of limitations and immunity:

  1. A member of the campus community aggrieved by a violation of this chapter may file a complaint with the governing body of the public institution of higher education.
  2. A member of the campus community aggrieved by a violation of this chapter may assert such violation as a defense or counterclaim in a disciplinary action or in a civil or administrative proceeding brought against the member of the campus community.
  3. A member of the campus community shall bring a claim for violation of this chapter pursuant to this section not later than one year after the day the cause of action accrues.
  4. This section shall not be interpreted to limit any other remedies available to a member of the campus community.
  5. Nothing in this section shall be construed to make any administrator, officer, employee, or agent of a public institution of higher education personally liable for acts taken pursuant to the individual’s official duties.

Upcoming Deadlines

April 5 is the Legislature’s second funnel date. This is when Senate bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of House committees and House bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of Senate committees.

May 3 is the 110th calendar day of the session and the legislator’s daily per diem expenses end.

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 8

March 8, 2019

Today marks the Legislature’s first deadline to have policy bills passed out of a Senate or House committee for them to remain eligible this legislative session. This self-imposed deadline does not apply to budget, tax and oversight bills.

Here’s some key bills that remain alive this session we are monitoring:

HF 276/SF274 – free speech on campus

HF 392 – exempts contracts for professional services from competitive bidding requirements; the conflicts-of-interests statutes in the Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board chapter would still apply

HF 477/SF 228 – bioscience-based economic development

HF 513/SF 159 – allows Iowa Dept. of Education to determine passing cut score for end of teacher preparation program exam (Praxis)

HF 636/SF 459 – carrying weapons in public places; employees can leave in locked vehicles at work

HF 648/SF 366 – sports wagering/fantasy sports betting

HSB 175/SF 342 – medical amnesty for alcohol cases

SF 188 – allows nonprojectile stun guns on campuses

SF 376 – requires mental health awareness, coping skills and suicide prevention be included in 7-12 grade health education courses

SF 428 – eliminates certain regulations for K-12 schools; the bill does not include the original sections that would have eliminated the requirement of hiring a school nurse and teacher librarians

Here’s some key bills that died during this week’s funnel:

SF 27 - prohibits the establishment or continuation of a tenure system at the Regents universities.

SF 289 – repealing statewide registration requirements for interior designers

SF 352 – required alternative pathways to teacher and administrator licensure

HF 91/SF 247 – minimum wage increases

HSB 2/HSB 56/HSB 57/SSB 1213 – all the bills making changes related to alternative delivery methods for construction projects on campus

April 5 is the Legislature’s second funnel date. This is when Senate bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of House committees and House bills and joint resolutions must be reported out of Senate committees.

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 7

March 1, 2019

The Senate release their fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget targets this week.  The Senate is at the same level as the current FY 2019 budget; the House is $48.6 million more than FY 2019 and the Governor’s recommendations are $39 million more. The education budget target for the Senate is $34.3 million more than FY 2019 and the House is $48.4 million higher than last year.  The budget chairs are currently working behind the scenes on the budget bills. We will not see any specific details until after the March Revenue Estimating Committee meeting, which is scheduled on March 15.

BUDGET TARGETSFY 2019 NetFY 2020 GOVERNORFY2020      HOUSEFY 2020 SENATEGov v. FY 2019House v. FY 2019Senate v. FY 2019
Administration & Regulation48,466,89360,515,985$52,420,985$55,576,149$12,049,092$3,954,092$7,109,256
Ag & Natural Resources39,357,52246,682,522$41,107,522$39,961,522$7,325,000$1,750,000$604,000
Economic Development40,216,34544,378,345$41,028,345$41,628,345$4,162,000$812,000$1,412,000
Education912,675,487963,275,618$961,044,271$946,955,971$50,600,131$48,368,784$34,280,484
Health & Human Services1,962,894,8201,920,888,698$1,941,888,698$1,928,358,285($42,006,122)($21,006,122)($34,536,535)
Justice Systems751,532,636762,328,881$770,370,901$763,240,901$10,796,245$18,838,265$11,708,265
State Aid to Schools & other standing appropriations3,864,188,2583,860,410,443$3,860,115,038$3,843,610,788($3,777,815)($4,073,220)($20,577,470)
GENERAL FUND TOTAL$7,619,331,961$7,658,480,492$7,667,975,760$7,619,331,961$39,148,531$48,643,799$0

The end of next week, March 8, is the Legislature’s first funnel date (Senate policy bills need to come out of a Senate committee and House policy bills need to come out of a House committee to remain eligible for debate this legislative session; this does not apply to budget, tax or oversight bills). There was a lot of subcommittee and committee work this week. Highlights include:

  • The House State Government Committee amended and passed their sports wagering/fantasy sports betting bill, HSB 198. The bill will now go to the House Ways and Means Committee. The Senate’s sports wagering/fantasy sports betting bill is SF 366 and is currently in the Senate Ways & Means Committee.
  • The House Public Safety Committee amended and passed HF 259, which among other things says an employer cannot prohibit employees from carrying a gun to their workplace if it is out of sight and in a locked vehicle. Language is included that the employer will be immune from liability; any claim must be paid by the injured employee’s private insurance policy. The Senate Judiciary Committee amended and passed a similar bill, SF 213. Both bills are now eligible for debate in their respective chamber.
  • The Senate Education committee adopted SF 428, eliminating certain regulations for K-12 schools. The bill does not include the original sections that would have eliminated the requirement of hiring a school nurse and teacher librarians. The bill is now eligible for Senate floor debate.
  • The Senate Education Committee adopted SF 376, which requires mental health awareness, coping skills and suicide prevention be included in 7-12 grade health education courses. The bill is now eligible for Senate floor debate.
  • SF 352 passed out of subcommittee this week. The bill requires alternative pathways to teacher and administrator licensure. The full committee will debate the bill next week. At the subcommittee meeting, we explained to the lawmakers the current Regents Alternative Pathway to Iowa Licensure (RAPIL).

This link is where you can find the complete list of bills the Board of Regents is registered on (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 6

February 22, 2019

Monday was UNI Day at the Capitol. Thank you to all the faculty, staff and students who drove to Des Moines to help showcase and advocate fo UNI. At the bottom is a gallery of photos with the legislators who stopped by.

The House release their budget targets this week.  The Senate should be releasing theirs soon.  The education budget target is $48.4 million higher than last year.  While the chairs may be working on the budget bills to get them ready to go, it is highly unlikely we will have specific numbers until after the March Revenue Estimating Committee Meeting scheduled on March 15.

HOUSE TARGETS      FY2020 HOUSE   DIFF FROM FY2019
Administration & Regulation$52,420,985$3,954,092
Ag & Natural Resources$41,107,522$1,750,000
Economic Development$41,028,345$812,000
Education$961,044,271$48,368,784
Health & Human Services$1,941,888,698($21,006,122)
Justice Systems$770,370,901$18,838,265
State Aid to Schools & other standing appropriations$3,860,115,038($4,073,220)
GENERAL FUND TOTAL$7,667,975,760$48,643,799

Both the House and Senate worked on sports betting bills this week.  The Senate State Government Committee voting out SSB 1168 on an 8-6 vote. The bill will go to the Senate Ways & Means Committee. The Senate bill currently does not include a tax rate or licensing fees. The House subcommittee on HSB 198 moved the bill forward on a 5-0 vote. The House bill does include licensing fees and rates (6.75% on revenues and annual fees of $15,000). The House bill comes before the House State Government Committee next.

This link is where you can find the complete list of bills the Board of Regents is registered on (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

March 8 is the Legislature’s first funnel date (Senate policy bills need to come out of a Senate committee and House policy bills need to come out of a House committee to remain eligible for debate this legislative session).

Click on the photo to see the full photo gallery

Group photo on the Grand Staircase Governor Reynolds with UNI student Lt. Governor Gregg with Pres. Nook Rep. Terry Baxter with UNI Students Rep. Pat Grassley with UNI staff who live in his district House Majority Leader and UNI alum Chris Hagenow with a UNI student from his district Rep. Lee Hein with a UNI student from his district Rep. Dustin Hite and Sen. Ken Rozenboom visiting with UNI staff Rep. Nook, Rep. Steve Holt, and NISG Kristin Ahart Rep. Bobby Kaufmann with a UNI student from his district Rep. Jennifer Konfrst with TC Rep. Bob Kressig visiting the School of Music table UNI State Relations Officer Mary Braun taking a selfie with Rep. Shannon Lundgren and Pres. Nook Rep. Gary Mohr visiting with UNI students Rep. Jeff Shipley visiting with a UNI student Rep. Sharon Steckman, TC, and Pres. Nook UNI alum Rep. Beth Wessel-Kroeschell visiting with a UNI student Rep. Dave Williams visiting with UNI students Rep. John Wills visiting with UNI students and staff UNI alum Rep. Cindy Winckler visiting with UNI Dept. of Technology Sen. Joe Bolkcom visiting with UNI students Sen. Nate Boulton visiting with Pres. Nook Sen. Claire Celsi visiting with a UNI student from her district Sen. Chris Cournoyer visiting with a UNI student from her district Sen. Jeff Edler with a UNI student from his district Sen. Kevin Kinney visiting with students from the Dept. of Technology Sen. Carrie Koelker visiting with UNI staff Sen. Tim Kraayenbrink with a UNI student from his district Sen. Mark Lofgren with a UNI student and staff Sen. Liz Mathis with TC and students from her district Sen. Zach Nunn and Pres. Nook Sen. Amy Sinclair visiting with UNI students and staff Sen. Jackie Smith visiting with Center for Violence Prevention Director Alan Heisterkamp TC on steps in Iowa Capitol Law Library View of UNI Day on first floor rotunda from the second floor rotunda

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 5

February 15, 2019

It was another busy week of subcommittee and committee work in the legislature.

The free speech and free expression on campus bill, SF 274 (formerly SSB 1099), passed the Senate Education Committee by a vote of 11-4. The bill awaits debate by the full Senate. The House subcommittee on HF 241 passed their bill out of subcommittee by a 2-1 vote. This bill would require the Board of Regents to adopt a policy similar to the University of Chicago January 2015 statement on free expression. The bill still needs to be voted on in the House Education Committee.

One of the bills related to alternative delivery methods for construction projects on campus had a subcommittee this week, HSB 2. The Board of Regents are registered in support of HSB 2. Subcommittee meetings are scheduled for HSB 56 and HSB 57 next week. The Board of Regents are opposed to these bills. The subcommittee is the same for all three bills. They are going to wait until they complete their subcommittees on all three bills before they determine what changes they will make.

HF 392 (formerly HSB 51) passed unanimously out of the House State Government Committee this week. The Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board brought the bill forward. Iowa Code section 68B.3 currently prohibits government officials and employees from selling goods or services in excess of $2,000 to ANY state agency absent public notice and competitive bidding. The conundrum with 68B.3 is that state law currently exempts certain types of services from competitive bidding, regardless of the amount of the contract (e.g. expert witnesses, doctors, lawyers, architects, engineers) but 68B.3 does not exclude those types of contracts. The bill amends 68B.3 to state the statute does not apply to a contract for professional services that is exempt from competitive bidding. The Ethics Board does not see the harm in excluding from 68B.3 professional services that are already exempt from competitive bidding requirements. The conflicts-of-interests statutes in chapter 68B would still apply.

This link is where you can find the complete list of bills the Board of Regents is registered on (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

Upcoming events in the legislature:

Feb. 18 – UNI Day at the Capitol, first floor rotunda

Mar. 8 – Legislature’s First Funnel Date (Senate policy bills need to come out of a Senate committee and House policy bills need to come out of a House committee to remain eligible for debate this legislative session)

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 4

February 8, 2019

UNI BCS presenting to Economic Development Appropriations SubcommitteeOn Tuesday, Randy Pilkington, Director of UNI’s Business and Community Service (BCS), and Jerry Theil, Director of UNI’s Metal Casting Center, presented to the legislature’s economic development appropriations subcommittee our return on their investment. UNI’s current economic development funding from the legislature is $1,066,419. The money supports UNI’s Institute for Decision Making, Metal Casting Center, MyEntreNet and Advance Iowa (Economic Gardening). For every $1 in economic development funding from the state, UNI is leveraging $5 from other sources. For the 19th consecutive year, BCS has served clients in all 99 Iowa counties. Their areas of focus include metal casting and additive manufacturing, entrepreneurship and working with small and medium sized businesses, community and economic development, market research, and environmental research and sustainability.

UNI’s budget request includes an additional $400,000 to support an additive manufacturing expansion. Equipment, space, and staffing are needed to meet growing demand and further position Iowa as the national leader in metal casting additive manufacturing. In addition, more funding will accelerate advancements in new technologies, such as investment casting 3D printing. The Metal Casting Center will leverage funding from the Legislature by attracting more fee-based projects, seeking grants, and expanding industry partnerships. Director Theil passed around several examples of 3D printed items showing committee members the capabilities that UNI can produce for Iowa’s manufacturing industries.

A copy of the BCS presentation can be found on the Legislature’s economic development subcommittee website.

It was another busy week of subcommittee and committee work in the legislature. Here are some of the bills we are monitoring:

  • The competing sports wagering bills held their first subcommittee meetings this week. The chairs of the subcommittees have said they will work on incorporating these issues into one bill that will be worked on later this session. The current bills include: HSB  101, HSB  102, HSB  103, HSB 124, SSB 1079, SSB 1080, SSB 1081, and SSB 1100.
  • The free speech and free expression on campus bills are SSB 1099, HF 316, and HF 241. The Senate held a subcommittee meeting this week on SSB 1099 and they are working on an amendment before the bill would be voted on in the Senate Education Committee.
  • SF 188 would allow stun guns on campus. This bill has been voted out of Senate Education Committee and is on the Senate floor awaiting floor action.
  • Several bills related to making changes to the teacher preparation end of program test (PRAXIS) have been introduced: HF 161, HF 43, HSB 17, and SF 159. SF 159 has passed out of the Senate Education Committee and is on the Senate floor awaiting floor action.
  • Bills related to alternative delivery methods for construction projects on campus include HSB 2, HSB 56, and HSB 57. There are no Senate companion bills. The Board of Regents is register in support of HSB 2 and opposed to HSB 56 and 57. The subcommittee on HSB 2 is scheduled to meet next week.
  • HF 2 is a bill that will exempt education materials from being taxed within the universities bookstores. Currently, the UNI bookstore already charges sales tax on all items except educational materials that are required by faculty. The subcommittee was held this week and they are working on an amendment before the bill would be voted on in the House Ways and Means Committee.

This link is where you can find the complete list of bills the Board of Regents is registered on (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

Upcoming events in the legislature:

Feb. 18 – UNI Day at the Capitol, first floor rotunda

Mar. 8 – Legislature’s First Funnel Date (Senate policy bills need to come out of a Senate committee and House policy bills need to come out of a House committee to remain eligible for debate this legislative session)

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 3

February 1, 2019

On Tuesday, January 29th, President Nook, along with the other two university presidents and Regent President Mike Richards, presented our budget recommendations to the Education Appropriations Subcommittee. In total, our budget proposal includes:

  • $99.7 million for general education (a $4 million increase)
  • $38 million over three years for the Industrial Technology Center renovation and expansion
  • $5.4 million for STEM education (no change; governor recommends a $1 million increase)
  • $1 million for economic development (no change)
  • $900,000 from the Regents Innovation Fund for economic development (no change)
  • $175,256 for the recycling and reuse center (no change)
  • $125,302 for real estate education (no change)

Additional information can be found on the Panther Caucus website.

We are registered against SF 27, which directs the Board of Regents to prohibit the establishment or continuation of a tenure system at the Regents universities. This week, a Senate subcommittee moved the bill to the full Senate Education Committee on a 2-1 vote. The first funnel day is March 8; bills need to come out of a committee to remain alive for the remainder of the legislation session. We will continue to urge the committee not to take up this bill. We use these talking points to dispute certain lawmakers’ assumptions:

  • Iowa would be the only state in the nation without tenure if this bill becomes law.
  • This will have a negative impact on recruiting top talent to teach Iowa students. The best faculty will work in other places.
  • This will affect our ability to attract outstanding graduate students because they often choose an institution based on where they can work with the best faculty.
  • Over time, this will affect university rankings as research dollars go down, likely reduce prestigious awards to faculty, and the highest performing students choose other states or institutions.
  • Fiscal impact is impossible to precisely calculate, but would include:
  • Faculty resigning for jobs at other universities (example of how limitations on tenure that were imposed in Wisconsin affected those universities almost immediately
  • Need to increase faculty salaries to be competitive in job market for top talent (Wisconsin example also mentions increasing salaries to stem the higher turnover rate)
  • Loss of millions in external grants as faculty leave and take grants with them
    • Less than 60% of faculty at the three Regent institutions either have tenure or are in the tenure-track. The other 40% are a mix of full-time and part-time clinical, research, adjunct or visiting professors for whom teaching, research or guiding students in clinical settings are their primary role.
    • Tenure is not a blanket granting of job security or immunity from termination. In order to earn tenure, faculty go through a rigorous 6-year probationary period when they can be dismissed for a broad range of reasons. If they do earn tenure, faculty can still be dismissed for just cause, program termination or financial exigency. In the last 10 years, about 25 tenured faculty members were terminated or resigned while they were under disciplinary review at one of the Regent’s universities.
    • Annual review processes with department heads set clear and specific expectations for each faculty member. Even with tenure, a poor record of teaching, research, or support for students can and sometimes does result in termination. Tenure policies at Regent universities ensure faculty have clear employment expectations.
    • It is important to note that several tenure-track (probationary) faculty members resign each year when during their annual reviews their department head notes they are not meeting standards for tenure and promotion.  Some leave before the final determination of not receiving tenure (e.g. year 3 or 4).   This helps keep the quality of the professoriate high, and it explains why terminations after tenure are less common.

A lot of committee and subcommittee work was conducted this week.  The Board of Regents is registered on 134 bills.  This link will provide a complete list of bills we are tracking (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

Upcoming events in the legislature:

Feb. 5 – Randy Pilkington, Director of BCS, will present our budget recommendations to the Economic Development Appropriations Subcommittee

Feb. 18 – UNI Day at the Capitol, first floor rotunda

Mar. 8 – Legislature’s First Funnel Date (Senate policy bills need to come out of a Senate committee and House policy bills need to come out of a House committee to remain eligible for debate this legislative session)

Click on the photo to see the full photo gallery

Pres. Nook presenting at Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting Pres. Nook presenting at Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting Pres. Nook presenting at Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 2

January 25, 2019

This week consisted of a lot of committee and subcommittee work.  There has also been a flood of new legislation introduced (over 350 bills so far).  The Board of Regents are registered on 67 bills.  We have been requested to provide the fiscal impact (fiscal note) on 15 of the bills.  This link will provide a complete list of bills we are tracking (in the box marked as lobbyist, type in Mary Braun).

We are registered against SF 27, which directs the Board of Regents to prohibit the establishment or continuation of a tenure system at the Regents universities. We are also opposed to two additional bills, HSB 56 and HSB 57, both of which would prohibit design build delivery method for our construction projects.  We registered in support of HSB 2, which specifically allows design build. 

Another bill making its way through the legislative process pertains to allowing the Dept. of Education to set a passing score for the PRAXIS test instead of being part of the top 25th percentile. The House and the Senate have companion bills, SSB 1031 and HSB 17. The Senate subcommittee met this week and is working on an amendment, which means both of these bills may change when they are considered by their respective committee.

Upcoming events in the legislature:

Jan. 29 – President Nook, along with the other two university presidents and Regent President Mike Richards, will present our budget recommendations to the Education Appropriations Subcommittee

Feb. 5 – Randy Pilkington, Director of BCS, will present our budget recommendations to the Economic Development Appropriations Subcommittee

Feb. 18 – UNI Day at the Capitol, first floor rotunda

 


This Week at the Statehouse – Week 1

January 17, 2019

Governor Reynolds released her budget recommendations on Tuesday. The University of Northern Iowa is grateful for Governor Reynolds' support for an additional $4 million for our FY 2020 budget, as well as multi-year funding for the renovation and expansion of UNI's Industrial Technology Center (ITC). You can find all the details at this link.

This is just the first step; the Legislature is the branch of government that appropriates the dollars to state agencies. Here are details of the Governor’s budget recommendations that will affect UNI:

  • If the additional $4 million in state funding is approved by the Legislature and the Governor, we would not increase resident tuition next year, which would allow us to become more competitive with our peer institutions.  This $4 million request corresponds with President Nook’s five-year conservative budget model so that tuition increases can be reasonable and predictable for Iowa families. UNI built a five-year budget model based on the university’s FY 2008 budget. UNI will manage a slow and steady enrollment increase, continue to look for cost savings and efficiencies, and keep our expenses at the Consumer Price Index of 1.75 percent. Though our budget anticipates an increase in out-of-state enrollment, UNI will not back away from the commitment to enroll at least the same percentage of Iowa high school graduates who attend the university.

  • ITC, originally built in 1974, needs critical improvements to the infrastructure and technology we use to prepare Iowa’s future industrial, manufacturing and construction workforce. The multi-year $38 million funding recommendation will be used to modernize and expand the ITC to serve the workforce needs of Iowa’s industry and to better prepare teachers to teach STEM and career and technical education disciplines.

  • The Governor is recommending a $1 million increase to STEM (UNI's math & science collaborative budget line-item).  The STEM Advisory Board, established in 2011 and housed at UNI, has a mission to increase student interest and achievement in STEM. The Governor’s budget book notes that results have shown that students who participate in their scale-up programs score higher than their peers in math, science, and reading on the state assessment. The Council also promotes STEM teacher externships, which make it possible for teachers to work in businesses in the summer and incorporate lessons learned back into their classrooms.

  • The rest of UNI's line-item budget requests are recommended at the same level as FY 2019 (real estate at $125,302; recycling and reuse center at $175,256; economic development at $1,066,419 (she did not recommend our $400,000 increase for additive manufacturing): and the Regents Innovation Fund at $900,000 to UNI (the fund is at $3 million total for UI, ISU, and UNI).

  • Governor Reynold’s Future Ready Iowa initiative, a goal of 70% of Iowans with education or training beyond high school by the year 2025, includes a grant program that would allow our students to get financial aid. The Future Ready Iowa Grant is intended to encourage Iowans who left college with a bachelor’s degree in a high-demand field of study to return and complete their degree. Students at Iowa’s public and private four-year higher education institutions may qualify. Grant recipients will receive a stipend to help cover tuition. She is recommending $1 million in FY 2020 and $1.75 million in FY 2021.

We look forward to working with Gov. Reynolds and members of the Iowa Legislature during this year's session to continue our commitment to ensuring a reasonable, predictable cost of education for Iowa families, while also providing the high-quality education our students need to be successful professionals and leaders in Iowa's changing economy.

GOVERNOR'S BUDGET BOOK LANGUAGE

UNI's mission is to provide transformative learning experiences that inspire students to embrace challenge, engage in critical inquiry and creative thought, and contribute to society. The focus is educating Iowans who tend to stay in Iowa to work.

As the state's comprehensive university, UNI focuses on educating Iowans who tend to stay in Iowa to work and live. Of alumni who graduated in the last ten years, 75% have stayed in Iowa.

UNI's excellent programs in business, social and behavioral sciences, humanities, arts and natural sciences prepare students to work and contribute in every employment sector across Iowa and provide a meaningful contribution to the state. And while the core focus remains undergraduate education, UNI also provides strong graduate programs that continue to attract students in all stages of life. Recent data shows 92% of UNI graduates were employed or in graduate school within six months of graduation.

UNI's FY 2020 higher education appropriation request of $99,712,362 includes a $4M increase and is based on a 0% tuition increase.

The funding increase is based on an analysis of how an equity adjustment and tuition differentiation would boost the university's goals. Strategic uses of these funds include financial aid, enrollment management, student engagement and success, and faculty/staff vitality. 

STATEMENT FROM BOARD OF REGENTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MARK BRAUN ON GOVERNOR’S BUDGET RECOMMENDATION

The Board of Regents sincerely appreciates Governor Reynolds’ support for the Regent enterprise with her FY2020 budget recommendation. The Governor’s budget supports many of the Board’s top initiatives.

In particular, we are extremely pleased that the Governor has recommended fully funding our universities’ general operating request of $18 million. With this level of funding, our universities can continue to provide the accessible, top-quality education that Iowa students deserve.

The Board and institutional leaders look forward to working with the Governor and members of the General Assembly during the legislative session to advocate for these recommendations.

---

The Board of Regents also had their legislative breakfast this week with the nine board members, three university presidents, the superintendent of the two special schools, and student government leaders from the three universities. Here are photos of President Nook with some of the legislators he visited with.

If you have any questions, please email me at mary.braun@uni.edu.

Click on the photo to see the full photo gallery

UNI Alumni Rep. Sandy Salmon (R-Janesville) with Pres. Nook Pres. Nook with Rep. David Kerr (R-Morning Sun) Pres. Nook with Senate Republican Staff Jillian Carlson and Sen. Amy Sinclair (R-Allerton) Pres. Nook with Sen. Craig Johnson (R-Independence) and Regent Nancy Boettger Pres Nook with Rep. Ray Sorensen (R-Greenfield) Pres. Nook with Rep. Gary Carlson (R-Muscatine) Pres. Nook with Rep. Gary Carlson (R-Muscatine) and Sen. Tom Greene (R-Burlington) Sen. Chris Cournoyer (R-LeClaire) with Pres. Nook Rep. Cecil Dolecheck (R-Mount Ayr) with Pres. Nook Pres. Nook with Rep. Lindsay James (D-Dubuque) Sen. Carrie Koelker (R-Dyersville) with Pres. Nook Rep. Bob Kressig (D-Cedar Falls) with Pres. Nook and his legislative clerk UNI alumni Gabby Ruggiero Pres. Nook with Karin Deery (D-Johnston) and Rep. John Forbes (D-Urbandale) Pres. Nook with Rep. Jeff Kurtz (D-Fort Madison) Rep. Mary Mascher (D-Iowa City) with Pres. Nook Pres. Nook with UNI alum Sen. Bill Dotzler (D-Waterloo) Pres. Nook with Sen. Annette Sweeney (R-Alden) Sen. Herman Quirmbach (R-Ames) with Pres. Nook Pres. Nook with Sen. Kevin Kinney (D-Oxford) Rep. Tedd Gassman (R-Scarville) with Pres. Nook Pres. Nook with Sen. Zach Wahls (D-Coralville) Sen. Tim Kapucian (R-Keystone) with Pres. Nook Sen. Zach Whiting (R-Spirit Lake) with Pres. Nook